non-judicial remedy

non-judicial remedy

Government of Canada turns back on communities harmed by Canadian mining overseas, loses trust of Canadian civil society

Today all fourteen civil society and labour union representatives of the government’s Multi-Stakeholder Advisory Body on Responsible Business Conduct Abroad resigned, citing an erosion of trust and confidence in the government’s commitment to corporate accountability.

Canadian government reneges on promise to create independent corporate human rights watchdog

Fifteen months ago, the government announced it would create an independent office with the power to investigate abuses by Canadian companies operating abroad. Instead, it unveiled today a powerless advisory post, little different from what has already existed for years.

Bringing responsibility home and engaging Canada on business and human rights

Last month legislators and experts on business and human rights gathered in Ottawa to discuss groundbreaking developments in home state legislative initiatives aimed at protecting human rights from corporate abuse. This article provides a summary of the discussion and comments made by panelists and keynote speakers at the Bringing Responsibility Home symposium.

Embedding the corporate responsibility to respect human rights into Canadian law

As the push for corporate accountability faces setbacks in the United States, could Canada hold the key for legislative progress in North America on business and human rights? In this guest post on the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre website, we discuss how Canada can emerge as a leader in this rapidly evolving field.

Don’t confuse dialogue with accountability in ombudsman debate

For years, the Canadian government has spoken of its “expectation” that Canadian companies will meet the “highest ethical standards” when operating abroad. It’s time to create a mechanism capable of finding out if this expectation is in fact being met.